This Innovative Chef Took the Traditional Maine Baked Bean Supper and Made it Cost $85

South Portland — When it comes to comfort food, Renaldo Altano’s Costoso Bistro is South Portland’s hottest new eatery.

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The renowned chef is known for taking traditional foods and adding his own funky spin.

Take the traditional Maine baked bean supper, served in countless “Beano” halls, rural homes, and church dinners. The meal itself is simple: baked beans, hot dogs, and brown bread.

But Altano’s version adds an extra $80 to the price tag. And the results speak for themselves.

“People cannot get enough of this traditional Maine dish,” Altano told us over the phone. He was busy preparing the night’s meal, a hot selling item for this Mainer-come-lately.

“My grandmother visited Maine when she was 18,” Altano said. That experience helped color his interest in Maine’s traditional cuisine.

“I thought, if she could visit Maine for three days in 1947, why couldn’t I open a restaurant in Maine?” From that idea sprung SoPo’s hottest new eatery.

“The molasses we use, I have it brought here from the Bahamas on traditional sailing ships. Some of my college friends are coopers and they make the barrels for me.”

While his fame seems to be blowing up, Altano doesn’t think anything of it. He’s just happy a meal traditionally enjoyed by the working class can be made far out of their financial reach.

13 thoughts on “This Innovative Chef Took the Traditional Maine Baked Bean Supper and Made it Cost $85”

  1. This is a satirical article from the Onion right? Save Jack Sparrow and the Black Pearl a trip up coast as Bajan ships their black strap through an importer in Miami but if you want a small batch to make a $500 pot of baked beans, they also ship UPS.

  2. This $85 Maine Baked Bean Supper took on a whole new meaning for me. As a chef I was blown away by the attention paid to the execution of this dish. 7 perfectly placed great norther beans, gently napped in a sublime black strap molasses and pomegranate coulis. Brilliant mouth feel with a finish of oak barrel and tannin. The thinnest sliver of fat back combined with the tiny natural casing pearls screamed molecular gastronomy . However the pièce de résistance of the culinary masterpiece was the brown bread foam. We were all so tempted by the Maine blueberry pie lollipop but at $40 , we opted for a finger tour of the tats on the chefs left arm instead. It comes gratis with the meal.

    1. Damn fool!

      Pomegranate Coulis was out of style last wintah.

      For something more nouveau; fresh fiddleheads steamed in Rumford river water taken straight from the Androscoggin are in order. For a personal touch add Clam Juice from Biddeford/Saco area, and a pinch of Lubec Cannery Salt to to the water. Embed Baked Bean into fiddlehead, drizzle with blackstrap molasses, and serve with a fine white from Lewiston/Auburn Vineyards (chilled).

      ENJOY!

  3. This is hilarious! Is it real? I have my great-grandmother’s beanpot and I can make this meal for, well, I’m going to re-create it and guess it’ll come under $20, if that. I can see that his grandmother visiting Maine for 3 days in 1947 is a solid connection. Still laughing.

  4. Story doesn’t say much. No address, no description other than sailing molasses in barrels. Is this real or is this the Maine version of “The Onion”?

  5. Frig the molasses, I’m wondering if he’s using little beans or big beans when he makes his “traditional Maine dish”? I’d pay extra for the big ones, but not 80 bucks!

  6. Whoa! Is that a dead piglet by this guy’s left elbow? That’s way too much pork for Maine baked beans if you ask me!

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