Linguists Impressed to Find Mainers Have Over 70 Swear Words for Snow

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Orono — Linguists studying the distinct Maine dialect believe they’ve cataloged every possible swear word Mainers have for snow.

Currently there are 73 swear words Mainers use to describe snow, but linguists with the University of Maine say that number could increase.

“There are obvious ones, the ones that most easily spring to mind when you first have to shovel a path through the dooryard,” said lead researcher Donna Ingalls.

“As the season progresses and snow accumulates, more words enter the lexicon.”

Ingalls said by March, Mainers are stringing together seemingly unrelated swear words to describe the late-season snow.

“Oh, absolutely. It almost sounds like a random barking of obscenities, but the way the Maine dialect works, the swears are often repeated for emphasis in long, long rants.”

Ever-resourceful Mainers will even sometimes invent swearwords on the spot.

“It’s as easy as taking two or three different swears, adding an -ing or -er to the end, and calling it good.”

“Maine’s linguistic depth is unparalleled when it comes to creative use of the filthiest possible language,” Ingalls said.

Sometimes different swear words with the same meaning will be exclaimed at the sight of a snow drift, or the snow around a mailbox that has to be shoveled so the goddamn friggin mailman doesn’t have to get out of his goddamn delivery truck, wouldn’t want that.


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36 thoughts on “Linguists Impressed to Find Mainers Have Over 70 Swear Words for Snow”

    1. The “weatherman” (now meteorologist) also gets some special name calling while shoveling “flurries”!

  1. “You never know how many inches you’re going to get, or how long it’s going to last.”

    1. Funnily enough…I got kicked out of high school for the day growing up in Maine for wearing a shirt with that saying on it.

      1. Actually, here in Canada they have been called either “letter carriers” or, in slang, “posties” all my life…. and I’m 70. 🙂 And a person, not a bot.

  2. The world’s record was set yesterday in Millinocket, the ‘f’ word used 7 times in one sentence of 9 words ending in snow.

  3. If the F#^%@ Town Plow Guy hits my F&^% Mailbox one F&^% more F@#$ing time, I’m won’t be held frigg’n responsible for the SH&% that is gonna hit the F&^%ing fan!!!!!!

  4. Friggin Motha nature’s off her friggin meds again and throwing s&$t left and right bub.
    I jus bout magin I’ma blow my f*#@ing back out again shoveling that ton of s$&+ at the end of my dooryard. F@*$(ng Larry in that Mother f*#@ing road grader smoked down the state road bout 45 mph and blew s&!t out to the back 40. That won’t melt till f+#ing July when the f$(+in black flies hatch and start tweaking the f+&k out flying around with f8)&ing ticks on em, biting mother’s a$$ while she’s trying to hang out the fu#”+ng whites on the line. And me! I’m still wondering if I should put up a new mail box or leave it in the fu#$-ng 5 fu$-&ng gallon bucket………..f@#$!

  5. all i can say is if you dont like the snow anymore,,,move,,,,Maine will always get snow,,,no matter what,,,thats why you live there,,,for ,,,SNOW

    1. Not really…..I lhave lived here all my life but summers are so much better than winter and then only reason to really live here in the Grand Ole State of Maine!

  6. I would like to see a complete list of these. As it would be a good read, even if you have to**! $#, promise we will understand. Is there a public release of this study?? Funny to think we have the foulest foul dialect around. Guess it helps we are Maineiacs.

  7. T. A Perky replies: The editor or possibly type setter was obviously bleary eyed from the last blizzard. The original meaning must have been a challenge to Mother Nature’s antics: “Mainers Over 70 Wear Swords for Snow”!

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