Maine Supreme Court Rules Rubber Marks Constitutionally-Protected Speech

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Portland — Not only does a super-buggy bake-up leave a literal mark, or ideally, two, it’s now protected under Maine’s right to free speech.

In a rare unanimous decision, the Maine Supreme Court ruled peeling-out is a form of free expression.

In her remarks, Chief Justice Leigh I. Saufley said the court finds laying rubber a way to give “a voice to the voiceless.”

“What good is a huge truck? What good are fat tires, a screaming exhaust set up, and a killer big block if all that power can’t be used to make a statement?”

Justice Andrew M. Mead’s statement on the decision echoed much of the same sentiment.

“For many in Maine, taching her up and dumping her is the only way they can be heard, sometimes from miles away.”

The killer posi-traction rubbermarks are often done late at night, by people who otherwise have no place to speak their minds.

“When you see a wicked rubbermark, and you know someone put her right sideways, that can speak volumes.”

For many, there’s no other way to let everyone in town know you either just got a new set of tires, or you’re just about to retire an old set.

“Imagine a world in which the majority are silenced? These rubbermarks are the petroglyphs of the modern era.”

“They also begin conversations,” Justice Mead said.

“Can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen a sweet patch and heard someone say ‘I guess they like buying new tires.'”

 

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20 thoughts on “Maine Supreme Court Rules Rubber Marks Constitutionally-Protected Speech”

  1. What a great way to instantly put a couple thousand miles of wear on your tires. Plus there’s nothing like the smell of freshly burned rubber!

  2. I personally work on trucks of my own and nothing shows more appreciative to the truck and i then going out and roasting tires ..
    Love the new free speach always be considerable to others tho and give it hell!!..

  3. Judges Saufley and Mead….stop being morons !….condoning this flies in the face of breaking the law by defacing public property and the law prohibiting disturbing the peace by creating unnecessary excessive vehicle noise. These clowns want to do this as a form “free speech” take it to an area better suited for this…like a race track. How about doing your jobs and uphold the laws in place for safety and quality of life

      1. Hey, leave Jim Bois alone! With a name like that, he never could figure out which pedal to push

  4. I don’t see anything wrong with roasting a set of tires. I many times have wanted to do it but knew that had I been caught it would be a huge fine, now I don’t condone doing it when the public safety is going to be involved but if you can do it without anybody being hurt, why not let them know what your vehicle can do.

  5. Too many times have i seen people turn on my road, roast their tires and proceed to do twice the speed limit down through where my kids, as well as many other kids play… My children’s safety always comes before anyone’s supposed right to “show what their vehicle can do.” This is dumb and I’ll gladly go to jail for destroying anyone who hits my kid while driving wrecklessly… I drive low and slow, for one, out of respect for everyone elses safety, and two, because, well, I don’t have to compinsate for anything…

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